‘Critical Thinking’ Review – John Leguizamo Mines Culture and Excitement from Chess

Critical Thinking, the directorial debut of John Leguizamo (who boasts well over 200 credits on IMDb), falls into the subgenre of movies where inspiring teachers have to lift up underprivileged students. Coming after films like Freedom Writers and Stand and Deliver, which was infamously spoofed by South Park, "How do I reach these kids?", is certainly…

‘Onward’ Review – Heartwarming Brotherly Love Makes Up for the Rest

Fantasy has seen a massive resurgence in the past decade thanks to popular series like Game of Thrones and The Witcher, as well as the modern rise of Dungeons and Dragons. Set within rich realms of wizards, dragons, and adventure- it seems obvious that Disney, with their own distinct brand of magic, would want to…

‘The Call of the Wild’ Review – Strong Storytelling Manages to Overcome Awkward Effects

The Call of the Wild is a classic tale that has withstood the test of time. Since it was first serialized in The Saturday Evening Post over a century ago in 1903, Jack London's story about the pull and power of nature has received numerous adaptations. The last one, 1997's The Call of the Wild:…

‘Gretel & Hansel’ Review – Superb Style Almost Makes Up for a Laborious Pace

The prospect of yet another take on the Hansel and Gretel fairy tale will probably make you roll your eyes at first. As one of the most popular Brothers Grimm stories, it has been through countless retellings and adaptations for more than two centuries. When you have versions of the tale that range from stoner…

‘The Report’ v. ‘Dark Waters’ – Two True Important Stories of Systemic Injustices

The Report and Dark Waters are a pair of recent releases about two very different yet equally important real-world topics. The former is a political drama while the latter is more of a legal thriller, but both are tasked with finding a way to unload boatloads of information onto an audience while still being an…

Op-ed: ‘6 Underground’ Should Be Classified as a Form of Pollution

It might sound ridiculous to call Michael Bay an auteur, but when it comes to large scale action presented to you in the most machismo and commercialized way possible- there is no greater artist than Bay. The director began his career making music videos before shifting towards commercials, where his campaigns for Miller Lite and…

‘Dolittle’ Review – A Bizarre and Expensive Mess

Dolittle starts out well enough and may trick you into believing that you are about a watch a decent, if not somewhat bland, children’s adventure. After an animated introduction, we see the young Tommy Stubbins (Harry Collett), out hunting with family. Stubbins, as he is called throughout the film, is kind and does not wish…

‘Underwater’ Review – A Surprisingly Solid Subterranean Thrill

Underwater, the new horror thriller from director William Eubank (The Signal), has received multiple comparisons to Ridley Scott’s 1979 Alien. There is certainly some merit in this praise. Both films feature a tight-knit crew working together in a confined space- for Alien it is a merchant vessel in the farthest reaches of space, for Underwater…

‘The Mandalorian’ Chapter 7 Review – Bringing It All Together

The Mandalorian has continued to delight Star Wars fans with each episode. This is, of course, thanks to its mysterious protagonist, intriguing world-building, familiar imagery, and Baby Yoda. The series' past three episodes have been standalone adventures. First taking Mando (Pedro Pascal) to a village under siege by old Imperial weapons, next to a New…

‘The Mandalorian’ Chapter 5 Review – New Faces on a Familiar Planet

The last episode of The Mandalorian solidified the series’ first season trajectory: a loose overarching plot of a Mando (Pedro Pascal) trying to protect a mysterious force-sensitive child (dubbed “Baby Yoda” by the fans) on the run, with a few standalone episodes along the way. Chapter 4, Sanctuary, very much felt like a self-contained story, but one…